Scotland's

360 Outdoor Adventures

Hills and Munros
Enter

Please upgrade your browser

This experience was made using the latest 360° video technology - unfortunately your browser doesn’t support these videos.

Download one of these browsers to experience the adventure:

Welcome to Scotland's 360 outdoor adventures

In Scotland there is a wealth of breathtaking hills and mountains, including many Munros, and here you’ll find the proof!

Scale Arthur’s Seat, Ben Lomond, Ben Nevis and The Cuillin with us in this interactive 360 degree experience, and get a taste of what it’s like to walk, cycle, climb and paraglide in these incredible, unspoilt spaces.

You’ll see that landscapes are just calling out for adventurous folk who like a challenge to come and test themselves against the elements in awesome surroundings.

Careful planning is essential when it comes to climbing Scotland’s peaks - as majestic and beautiful as they are, hills and mountains can be very dangerous places in certain weather conditions or if you aren’t adequately prepared.

This will open in the youtube app

For the best experience turn your device to landscape mode. Move your device to look around.

Ben Nevis

Ben Nevis

The high one

WHY CLIMB BEN NEVIS?

The most famous Munro of all, Ben Nevis is a fascinating and challenging mountain - climbing Ben Nevis gains you some serious bragging rights. The feeling of achievement when you scale the tallest mountain in the United Kingdom is pretty tough to beat, and you will experience breathtaking views in every direction (when the weather is on your side, that is!).

THE ROUTE

The path to the top of the highest Munro is long, steep and should not be undertaken lightly. Beware - the start of the path is relatively easy but it becomes increasingly rocky, arduous and exposed. The trek can be started from Glen Nevis Visitor Centre, Glen Nevis Youth Hostel or Achintee Car Park. Either way you will end up on top of Scotland’s highest Munro and the UK’s highest mountain; a reward well worth the hike! Nevis Landscape Partnership work tirelessly on the Ben Nevis mountain path to control erosion and litter, so please ensure you respect the environment for future generations.

Location
Fort William
altitude
1345 M / 4412 FT
distance
10.75 MILES / 17 KM
climb time
7 - 9 HOURS
difficulty
Intermediate - Expert
See routes

Safety

The difficulty of this hike is often under estimated. If in doubt, always turn back. It may also be worth hiring a local mountain guide to assist you. Check the mountain weather before you go and ensure you take appropriate clothing, as the weather can change very quickly at the summit. Make sure someone knows where you’re headed and ensure that you have plenty of time to get back well before nightfall. Any ascent in snow requires winter equipment and skills. Make sure you fill in a mountain safety route card and leave it with someone you trust.

Ben Nevis Ben Nevis route

See the climb in 360° video

This requires the YouTube app

Glen Nevis
16m
Hiking up
248m
Mountain stream
677m
Approaching the top
1153m
The summit
1306m
Paramotoring
1800m
Imagery ©2016 DigitalGlobe, Getmapping plc, Landsat, TerraMetrics, Data SIO, NOAA, U.S Navy, NGA, GEBCO, Data LDEO-Columbia, NOAA, Map data ©2016 Google
00:00 / 00:00
    Click and drag to explore the 360° video

    Glen Nevis

    altitude 16m
    56.826718° N -5.0735378° E

    Over 100,000 people walk to the summit of Ben Nevis every year – are you ready to join them? Before you set off from Glen Nevis Visitor Centre stop to double check you’ve got everything you need – have you got your waterproofs? Warm layers and a hat and gloves? Plenty of refreshments? Take a look at the WalkHighlands kit list for more ideas. If you have any questions before your ascent the rangers in the visitor centre will be happy to help out. And lastly – have you checked the weather forecast?

    From the centre simply head along the path with the river to your right.

    Hiking up

    altitude 248m
    56.826718° N -5.0735378° E

    Watch your feet as you zigzag up the rocky path to the left of Loch Meall an t-Suidhe. Don’t forget to turn around and admire the view of the loch behind you and the mountains ahead as you catch your breath.

    Mountain stream

    altitude 677m
    56.826718° N -5.0735378° E

    Look up to see the impressive Red Burn as it cascades down the mountain! Look down at your peril from this high mountain path. When you stop to refuel or take in the view don’t forget to look to the skies – the mountain environment is ideal for spotting birds including the ptarmigan, raven and even golden eagle. Find out more about nature and wildlife on Ben Nevis.

    Approaching the top

    altitude 1153m
    56.826718° N -5.0735378° E

    After carefully following the narrow zig zag path of the Five Finger Gully you’ll find yourself on the final approach to the top. The ground may even out up here on the plateaux, but it’s still a tricky ascent with loose rocks under foot. In poor visibility the manmade cairns can help to navigate your way to the top, but if you are in any doubt of your route it’s safer to turn back.

    The summit

    altitude 1306m
    56.826718° N -5.0735378° E

    You’ve made it to the highest point in the United Kingdom! In good weather you will be rewarded with excellent panoramic views, so don’t forget to pack a camera. The summit is home to the remains of Ben Nevis Observatory, which opened in 1882 and was in use until 1904, when part of the structure was taken over by the summit’s hotel, which remained open until 1916.

    Don’t linger too long – you’ll want to return before nightfall, and your journey is only half way through! Although there is an emergency hut, it is not intended for planned used, but only as a last resort. Descent is by the same way you came up.

    Paramotoring

    altitude 1800m
    56.796930° N -5.0033310° E

    Only those with nerves of steel and hours of training can launch themselves launch themselves into the sky with a powermotor and circle Ben Nevis, but here you can get an idea of what it’s like. You’ll be rewarded with a gentle descent accompanied by amazing views of the mountains, Fort William and Loch Linnhe beyond. Can you spot the walking route up by Loch Meall an t-Suidhe?

    If climbing the UK’s highest mountain just isn’t enough adventure for one day then paramotoring or tandem paragliding will surely give the whole experience the extra edge. Paramotoring involves a motor powered propeller that gives lift to your paraglider wing, and is best left up to accredited pilots. A tandem paragliding flight is the closest you can get to this experience without doing the full training.

    Cuillin Ridge

    Cuillin Ridge

    The difficult one

    The jagged peaks and sheer drops of this rocky mountain range on the Isle of Skye are out of this world. With 11 Munros and 30 summits, the Cuillin landscape is immense.

    Why climb the Inaccessible Pinnacle?

    Considered to be the hardest Munro summit to scale, the In Pinn as it’s known, can only be conquered by rock climbing. The sense of achievement as you stand on top with your hands aloft is hard to match.

    The route

    The Cuillin takes a full week to explore in its entirety, but even a day’s exploration is exhilarating. Head up to Coire Lagan from Glen Brittle before tackling the vertigo-inducing ridge of Collie’s Ledge. Then it’s on to climbing the Inaccessible Pinnacle and enjoying a thrilling abseil down - phew!

    Location
    Isle of Skye
    altitude
    986 m/ 3235 ft (Inaccessible Pinnacle)
    distance
    7.5 miles/12 km approx
    climb time
    6 - 8 hours
    difficulty
    Expert
    See routes

    Safety

    The Inaccessible Pinnacle should only be attempted by experienced climbers, but there are some alternative non-technical walks on the Cuillin Ridge for experienced walkers. Even so, it may be best to book onto a trip with a mountain guide or guiding company operating in the area, such as Skye Adventure. Plan your route carefully, and check the Mountain Weather Information Service to ensure that conditions are suitable.

    Cuillin Ridge Cuillin Ridge route

    See the climb in 360° video

    This requires the YouTube app

    Glen Brittle
    13 m
    Coire Lagan
    571 m
    Collie's Ledge
    747 m
    Inaccessible Pinnacle
    986 m
    Imagery ©2016 DigitalGlobe, Getmapping plc, Landsat, TerraMetrics, Data SIO, NOAA, U.S Navy, NGA, GEBCO, Data LDEO-Columbia, NOAA, Map data ©2016 Google
    00:00 / 00:00
      Click and drag to explore the 360° video

      Glen Brittle

      altitude 13 m
      57.2105° N -6.2886° E

      Start your journey at Glen Brittle, not far from Skye’s famous Fairy Pools, on the west of the island. Follow a grassy slope and continue upwards as the trail steepens, zig zagging through boulder-strewn fields, crossing fallen scree and passing little crags.

      Coire Lagan

      altitude 571 m
      57.2075° N -6.2343° E

      Tackle the uneven ground and work your way up hill – make sure to look back and admire the views over to Eigg and Rum. You’ll be rewarded with a rest at Coire Lagan, a small loch set within a glacier-carved bowl of the coire. Take a minute or two to catch your breath and soak up the atmosphere.

      Collie's Ledge

      altitude 747 m
      57.2101° N -6.2343° E

      This exposed rock face is a serious climb only for those with experience and not one for those scared of heights! Watch out for unstable scree as you make the steep ascent from the loch and on to Sgurr Mhic Choinnich. The climb to Collie’s Ledge can be bypassed if you are keen to get on to the Inaccessible Pinnacle.

      Inaccessible Pinnacle

      altitude 986 m
      57.2133° N -6.2350° E

      There are a variety of routes up the Inaccessible Pinnacle on Sgurr Dearg dependent on weather, conditions and skill level. Be aware of loose rock as you climb. The most popular and moderately leveled climb is up the East Ridge, which rises 65 m (213 ft) into the sky. A narrow and exposed route with vertical drops on both sides, it is particularly disconcerting when the wind is blowing!

      But when you reach the summit it feels like you’re on top of the world. Keep your eyes peeled for sea eagles! Then it’s time to abseil down and give yourself a big pat on the back for your nerves of steel.

      Ben Lomond

      Ben Lomond

      The beacon

      Rising up from the east shore of Loch Lomond, Ben Lomond is Scotland’s most southerly Munro and is only 37 miles (58 km) north of Glasgow. A popular option as a first Munro, it’s also a hit with mountain bikers.

      Why choose Ben Lomond?

      Ascend to the top of Ben Lomond for outstanding views, challenging terrain and wildlife spotting.

      The route

      On the main route you’ll follow a clearly marked trail and ascend quickly through woodland before getting your first view of Loch Lomond. The path zigzags and then steepens towards the summit.

      Cyclists be warned! You’ll have to carry your bike over some rocky terrain, but you will be rewarded with some seriously fast mountain biking on the way down.

      Location
      Loch Lomond
      altitude
      990 m
      distance
      7.5 miles/12km
      climb time
      4.5 - 5.5 hours
      difficulty
      Intermediate
      See routes

      Safety

      Ben Lomond is a strenuous walk in summer and much harsher in winter. Get advice from the Mountaineering Council of Scotland and check the Mountain Weather Information Service before you go. Mountain bikers should bear in mind that the route is popular with walkers, especially in the summer months. Whether you plan on scaling it on legs or wheels, make sure you know the Scottish Outdoor Access Code, which offers advice for cyclists and mountain bikers.

      Ben Lomond Ben Lomond route

      See the climb in 360° video

      This requires the YouTube app

      Rowardennan
      19 m
      Mountain bike ascent
      389 m
      Summit
      990 m
      Descent
      646 m
      Imagery ©2016 DigitalGlobe, Getmapping plc, Landsat, TerraMetrics, Data SIO, NOAA, U.S Navy, NGA, GEBCO, Data LDEO-Columbia, NOAA, Map data ©2016 Google
      00:00 / 00:00
        Click and drag to explore the 360° video

        Rowardennan

        altitude 19 m
        56.1593° N -4.6433° E

        Set off from one of the car parks at Rowardennan on the east bank of Loch Lomond. Or, in the summer months, you could begin your adventure from Luss or Tarbet and arrive at Rowardennan pier by ferry. Walk or cycle up the main path through woodland, cross through a clearing and head on uphill.

        Mountain bike ascent

        altitude 389 m
        56.1685° N -4.6312° E

        Once out of the trees, be sure to take a look back to admire your first view of Loch Lomond. On some days you might even spot the unmistakable outline of the Cobbler (Ben Arthur) if you look north west.

        Veer left on the path around the mountain hollow of Coire Corrach and up to the Sron Aonaich ridge. The climb then zig-zags up to the summit – be warned the weather can change both suddenly and dramatically up here!

        Summit

        altitude 990 m
        56.1890° N 4.6311° E

        Take in the views from the summit, it’s one of the best places to admire the sheer size of Loch Lomond and the astounding beauty of the surrounding area. See if you can pick out the peaks of Glen Coe and the Black Mount to the north. Over on the west you can see over to the hills of Argyll and Kintyre, and perhaps even the islands of Islay and Jura in the distance. Soak it all up.

        See more mountain biking routes in the area.

        Descent

        altitude 646 m
        56.1785° N -4.6240° E

        Experienced walkers can choose the rockier descent of the Ptarmigan route, while mountain bikers can head back down the way they’ve come, keeping an eye out for walkers on the narrow single track.

        Cycle onto the Sron Aonaich ridge where the gradient shallows and your speed will go through the roof! It’s here where a puncture is most likely, so be prepared. From the plateau the route winds steeply back down to Rowardennan. Congratulations, route complete!

        Arthur's Seat

        Arthur's Seat

        The city one

        Rising dramatically in Edinburgh’s city centre, Arthur’s Seat is the main peak of a small group of hills in Holyrood Park, which is located near the Palace of Holyroodhouse and the Scottish Parliament.

        Why walk it?

        Arthur’s Seat boasts incredible views of the city and beyond from various levels, and depending on the time of day you might enjoy watching the city awake at dawn, or pack a picnic and have lunch with a view.

        The walk

        There are a couple of main paths to choose from, with options for those who like a more leisurely gradient, as well as people who are up for a steeper incline. On this route you’ll pass St Margaret’s Loch, explore the ruins of St Anthony’s Chapel and climb up to the rocky summit for stunning views of the city.

        Location
        Edinburgh
        altitude
        279 m
        distance
        3 miles/4.75km
        climb time
        2 - 2.5 hours
        difficulty
        Beginner
        See routes

        Safety

        Although small, Arthur’s Seat should be ascended with caution. Changes in weather, light conditions and popularity can result in a tricky climb. Check the weather before you go and follow the Scottish Outdoor Access Code.

        Arthur's Seat Arthur's Seat route

        See the climb in 360° video

        This requires the YouTube app

        Holyrood
        38 m
        St Margaret’s Loch
        42 m
        St Anthony’s Chapel
        72 m
        Hiking up
        111 m
        Summit
        279 m
        Imagery ©2016 DigitalGlobe, Getmapping plc, Landsat, TerraMetrics, Data SIO, NOAA, U.S Navy, NGA, GEBCO, Data LDEO-Columbia, NOAA, Map data ©2016 Google
        00:00 / 00:00
          Click and drag to explore the 360° video

          Holyrood

          altitude 38 m
          55.9511° N -3.1769° E

          With the Scottish Parliament and the Palace of Holyroodhouse behind you, you can’t miss Salisbury Crags and the summit of Arthur’s Seat. Holyrood Park, a former 12th century hunting estate, was created in 1541 and is a popular spot for walking dogs, playing sport, flying kites and eating picnics.

          St Margaret’s Loch

          altitude 42 m
          55.9531° N -3.1605° E

          St Margaret’s Loch is home to a number of swans and ducks, with geese taking up residence at certain times of the year. While it’s tempting to feed these pretty waterfowl, don’t give them bread or other processed foods - chopped vegetables will go down a treat though!

          St Anthony’s Chapel

          altitude 72 m
          55.9510° N -3.1611° E

          Uphill from St Margaret’s Loch you’ll find the remains of St Anthony’s Chapel on a rocky outcrop. It is thought to date back to the 1300s but fell into disuse after the Reformation in 1560. Nowadays it makes a great spot for taking pictures.

          Hiking up

          altitude 111 m
          55.9432° N -3.1674° E

          Catch your breath and take in the view - on a clear day you can see right out to Leith and across the Forth. Various paths up the hill converge as you make the final stretch to the summit. Watch your step as you walk up, it gets a little rocky near the top.

          Summit

          altitude 279 m
          55.9436° N -3.1612° E

          Once you’ve reached the summit you’ll be rewarded with the sight of a panoramic cityscape of Edinburgh from the trig point. Explore the rocky summit and, depending on the weather, you might be able to spot Bass Rock to the south-east, Fife to the north, and the Pentlands to the west too.